Climate Change: Is It For Real?

Climate Change: Is It For Real?

Iowa State University hosts public lecture Feb. 6 at Ames to focus on climate, agriculture and sustainability.

No matter how you describe it, Iowa's climate is changing and the impact on Iowa agriculture will be very significant. Iowa State University professor Gene Takle will address this controversial issue, and how shifting weather patterns also are changing how Iowa farmers do business, at the annual Shivvers Memorial Lecture on Sunday, Feb. 6, 2011 at Ames.

Takle's lecture title poses the larger question: "Will Climate Change Impact the Sustainability of Iowa Farms?" The speech will begin at 7 p.m. in the Sun Room of the Memorial Union on the ISU campus.

Designing sustainable practices for managing today's landscapes under pressure for producing food, feed, fuel and fiber presents major challenges. However, designing sustainable practices that also are resilient under future climates adds a new dimension to these challenges. Takle, who has a dual appointment in ISU Agronomy and ISU Geological and Atmospheric Sciences, will outline some current and future threats to sustainability of resilient landscapes. 

ISU prof recognized as one of the leading climate scientists

"Gene is internationally recognized as one of our leading climate scientists in the United States and he has given considerable attention to the impacts of climate change on agriculture, so his lecture should be of special interest to Iowa farmers," says Fred Kirschenmann, Distinguished Fellow for the Leopold Center of Sustainable Agriculture at ISU. The Leopold Center is co-sponsor of the event along with the ISU Committee on Lectures.

Takle is the director of Iowa State's Climate Science Program and is a member of the Iowa Climate Change Impacts Committee that recently submitted its report to the Iowa Legislature. The report details the impact of climate change in Iowa (details at www.energy.iowa.gov).

The Shivvers lecture has been presented at ISU since 1969 in memory of John Shivvers, who farmed near Knoxville. The lectures focus on ways that agriculture can sustain rather than destroy natural resources. This year's lecture is part of ISU's Live Green! Sustainability Series.

Hide comments

Comments

  • Allowed HTML tags: <em> <strong> <blockquote> <br> <p>

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Publish