Ensure Sensitive Varieties Enter Proper Marketing Channels, NCGA Warns

Ensure Sensitive Varieties Enter Proper Marketing Channels, NCGA Warns

Farmers participating in the Right to Grow system should ensure grain from designated plots enters proper marketing channels

The National Corn Growers Association this week issued a reminder to growers regarding the importance of properly channeling grain this harvest season, particularly the grain planted as part of the Right to Grow system for limited release of Syngenta's Duracade trait.

Related: Planting Syngenta's Agrisure Duracade? Follow the Protocols

The Right to Grow system tightly controlled the sale of seed corn produced using Duracade technology in attempt to keep it out of shipments to overseas markets that haven't yet approved the trait. The program also limited the amount of Duracade released to ensure corn grown could be effectively managed.

Farmers participating in the Right to Grow system should ensure grain from designated plots enters proper marketing channels

Through a marketing agreement signed with Gavilon, Right to Grow provides a specified marketing channel for all corn grown with Duracade technology and acts as another line of assurance farmers will be able to steward their grain into proper channels.

Related: Continued Caution on Syngenta's Duracade

NCGA urges growers to double check any seed plots on farms or contracted with third parties to verify that they know what precisely has been planted and ensure sensitive varieties enter into appropriate marketing channels.

NCGA also offers a full listing of commercial hybrids containing the Duracade trait on its Know Before You Grow online tool.

As harvest approaches, NCGA says it will resume a public campaign to highlight the importance of following stewardship agreements.

Related: Syngenta Deems 'Right to Grow' Duracade Marketing Program Effective

Know Before You Grow stems from NCGA's stance that U.S.-grown biotech hybrids not intended for some export markets should not be placed into export channels.

Regardless of export status, however, NCGA says there is an ample market for U.S. biotech corn. Growers should always read their grower agreements and communicate with both their seed salespersons and grain buyers to ensure proper stewardship.

Source: NCGA

Hide comments

Comments

  • Allowed HTML tags: <em> <strong> <blockquote> <br> <p>

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Publish