Farm Bureau releases more Waters of the U.S. maps

Farm Bureau releases more Waters of the U.S. maps

AFBF says more maps show considerable acreage in several states will be subject to WOTUS regulation

The American Farm Bureau says it has more maps that show how the Waters of the U.S. regulation will impact farms across Missouri, Oklahoma, New York and Wisconsin.

The maps, released last week, were prepared by Geosyntec Consulting. Farm Bureau says they show "how the Environmental Protection Agency intends to radically expand its jurisdiction over land use via the newly issued Waters of the United States rule."

Related: North Dakota judge clarifies 13-state WOTUS ruling

The rule, monitored by the U.S. EPA and Army Corps of Engineers, outlines what waters are "waters of the United States" and can be regulated under the Clean Water Act.

AFBF says more maps show considerable acreage in several states will be subject to WOTUS regulation

Implementation of the rule in 13 states was halted through a preliminary injunction granted by a court in North Dakota on Aug. 27.

While some ag groups suggested the injunction could be effective in states outside of the 13 named in the suit, the judge on Friday said that it only applies to the states named – North Dakota, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Idaho, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, South Dakota, Wyoming and New Mexico.

Remaining states are under the rule as of Aug. 28.

AFBF says according to its maps, nearly all of the acreage in Missouri, Oklahoma, New York and Wisconsin would fall under EPA scrutiny.

Landowners have no reliable way to know which of the water and land within that area will be regulated, yet they must still conform their activities to the new law, AFBF said.

Related: Tax dollars and the Waters of the U.S.

"The EPA's new rule places farmers in the agency's crosshairs for using the same safe, scientifically sound and federally approved crop protection tools they've used for years," AFBF President Bob Stallman said. "This rule creates a new set of tools for harassing farmers in court, and does it all with language that is disturbingly vague and subject to abuse by future regulators. It's worth saying again: The EPA needs to withdraw this rule and start over."

More maps detailing EPA's overreach in Missouri, Montana, New York, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Virginia and Wisconsin can be found on the AFBF website.

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