Grassley Takes to Senate Floor to Defend Ethanol

Iowa senator has strong comments about smear campaign.

Senator Charles Grassley, R-Iowa, spoke on the floor of the Senate Thursday about misinformation that is being spread about ethanol and biofuels. There has been a lot of media coverage that ethanol is the cause of rising food prices despite several leading economists and scientific studies showing that high energy prices and other factors are the main culprit.

Several states and a fair number of public officials have bought into the misinformation and have requested waivers from the Renewable Fuels Standard and stoppage of biofuel mandates. Grassley says an anti-ethanol public relations campaign is being bankrolled by the Grocery Manufacturers Association.

"According to reports, downtown D.C. lobbyists, the Glover Park Group and Dutko Worldwide, are leading the effort to undermine and denigrate the patriotic achievement of America's farmers to reduce our dependence on foreign oil while also providing safe and affordable food," said Grassley in his floor statement. "Food prices are going up, and I'm sympathetic to those at home and abroad who are struggling with the higher prices. But to put all the blame at the feet of the U.S. ethanol industry is outrageous and misplaced. I think it's important for policy-makers and the American people to know who's behind this effort."

The National Corn Growers Association has voiced their appreciation for Grassley's support of the ethanol industry on the Senate floor.

"We appreciate the bold comments made by Senator Grassley," said NCGA President Ron Litterer. "Big Food and their allies have waged a well-calculated effort to roll back ethanol mandates. It's important that the American people are educated on their fear tactics and misinformation."

To view Grassley's entire statement and the documents detailing the campaign against corn ethanol, click HERE.

Hide comments

Comments

  • Allowed HTML tags: <em> <strong> <blockquote> <br> <p>

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Publish