Iowa Corn, Soybean Harvest Picks Up Pace

Iowa Corn, Soybean Harvest Picks Up Pace

Weekly USDA survey shows 87% of state's 2013 soybean crop, 55% of corn harvested as of Oct. 27.

Iowa's 2013 harvest picked up speed last week, with 87% of the soybeans and 55% of corn harvested as of October 27. That's according to the weekly statewide survey released October 28 by the Iowa office of USDA's National Ag Statistics Service in Des Moines. The soybean harvest is two days ahead of normal, the first time all season. Iowa's corn harvest is running behind the 5-year average of 60%.

Nationally, 77% of the soybean harvest was completed, matching the 5-year average. And 59% of U.S. corn was harvested, behind the average of 62%.

GAINING GROUND: Iowa's harvest made significant progress last week. USDA survey shows 55% of the state's 2013 corn crop has been harvested as of October 27 and 87% of the soybeans are in the bin. Iowa soybean harvest is running 2 days ahead of normal, first time all season. Iowa corn harvest is lagging behind 5-year average of 60%. Statewide there were six days suitable for fieldwork. Other activities for the week included fall tillage and liquid manure and fertilizer application.

Last week in Iowa snow fell in the northern part of the state, and a killing frost reached the last few southern locations where it had not yet occurred. The report shows 53% of the state's topsoil moisture levels were short to very short, and subsoil moisture levels were 67% short to very short. Moisture content of all corn in the field was estimated at 21% while moisture content of corn harvested was 19%, as of Sunday October 27.

Weekly survey shows 20% of Iowa's corn crop and 17% of the soybean crop was harvested last week

"It was a busy week in farm fields across the state last week as 20% of the corn crop and 17% of soybeans were harvested," notes Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Bill Northey. "Farmers worked long hours to make as much progress as possible since wet weather is forecast for this coming week—the week beginning October 28--and that could again slow harvest."~~~PAGE_BREAK_HERE~~~

The complete weekly Iowa Crops & Weather report is available on the Iowa Department of Agriculture & Land Stewardship's website or on USDA's site. The report summary follows here:

CROP REPORT: Corn and soybean harvest advanced rapidly in Iowa during the week ending October 27, 2013, according to the USDA's National Agricultural Statistics Service. With soybean harvest now slightly ahead of normal, this marked the first time all season soybean progress was ahead of the 5-year average. Statewide there were 6.0 days suitable for fieldwork. Other activities for the week included fall tillage, as well as liquid manure and fertilizer applications. Snow fell in the northern part of the state, and a killing frost finally reached southern Iowa.

Topsoil moisture levels rated 21% very short, 32% short, 47% adequate and zero percent surplus. Subsoil moisture levels rated 31% very short, 36% short, 33% adequate and zero percent surplus. Grain movement from farm to elevator was rated 60% moderate to heavy. Also as of October 27, 96% of Iowa reported adequate or surplus off-farm grain storage availability and 88% reported adequate or surplus on-farm grain storage availability.

Iowa soybean harvest now stands at 87% complete, 2 days ahead of normal

Iowa farmers harvested 20% of their corn for grain or seed during the week. Fifty-five percent has now been harvested, 5 percentage points behind normal. Moisture content of all corn in the field was estimated at 21% while moisture content of corn harvested was 19%. Corn lodging was rated at 65% none, 21% light, 11% moderate and 3% heavy. Corn ear droppage was rated at 75% none, 16% light, 8% moderate and 1% heavy. Corn condition was 5% very poor, 13% poor, 33% fair, 40% good and 9% excellent. Soybean harvest increased 17 percentage points and stands at 87% complete, 2 days ahead of normal.~~~PAGE_BREAK_HERE~~~

Pasture condition rated 23% very poor, 26% poor, 32% fair, 17% good and 2% excellent. Stress on livestock was minimal during the week. Hay supplies were considered 16% short, 75% adequate, and 9% surplus across Iowa with 91% rated in fair to good condition.

IOWA PRELIMINARY WEATHER SUMMARY—For week ending October 27, 2013

By Harry Hillaker, State Climatologist, Iowa Department of Agriculture & Land Stewardship

It was a very cool week across Iowa with temperatures averaging 9.2 degrees below normal. A few locations across the south and west edged a little warmer than normal on Sunday (Oct. 20) but all of the state was well below normal the remainder of the reporting week. Keokuk was the warm spot with a 70 degree high on Sunday (Oct. 20) while Stanley (Buchanan Co.) and Mount Ayr dipped to 18 degrees on Friday (Oct. 25) morning. A hard freeze was recorded in many areas on Tuesday (Oct. 22), Friday (Oct. 25) and Sunday (Oct. 27) mornings. The last few southeast Iowa locations that had avoided a freeze this season finally had one on Friday.

Last few areas of Iowa that had avoided a freeze this fall finally had one Oct. 25

Meanwhile light rain and/or snow moved into northwest Iowa Monday (Oct. 21) evening and spread across all but the far northeast and southwest corners of the state on Tuesday (Oct. 22). Snow briefly accumulated along a line from Sioux Falls to the Quad Cities with the greatest amounts of around two inches falling across east central Iowa. Light rain, with some snow flurries, fell across the southwest one-half of the state on Wednesday (Oct. 23). The remainder of the week was dry. Only a few sprinkles or flurries occurred over far northeast and southwest Iowa during the week while Davenport reported the most precipitation with 0.47 inches (falling as 1.5 to 2.5 inches of snow). The statewide average precipitation was 0.13 inches while normal for the week is 0.56 inches. Soil temperatures as of Sunday (Oct. 27) were mostly in the mid to upper 40's but may briefly climb back into the low 50's by midweek.

TAGS: Soybean USDA
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