New Video 'Out to the Lakes' Available

New Video 'Out to the Lakes' Available

"Out to the Lakes" is a provocative and engaging film that encourages viewers to think about water quality and their relationship with their local lake or water body. It's available on YouTube; also by request from Iowa Learning Farms.

Is there a water quality problem in Iowa?

This question is posed to Iowans in the latest video produced by the Iowa Learning Farms program of Iowa State University Extension. "Out to the Lakes" is a provocative and engaging film that encourages viewers to think about water quality and their personal relationship with their local lake or water body. The film addresses water quality through the perspective of lakes and the water bodies that feed them.

Out to the Lakes

The case study used in the film is Black Hawk Lake in west central Iowa. Black Hawk Lake is used mainly for recreational activities including swimming, boating and fishing. On screen, several local residents share their experiences and concern for the lake that has brought them so much personal joy.

Even though the film focuses on the happenings at a particular lake, the same sentiments can be applied to many lakes in Iowa and the Midwest. Like Black Hawk, lakes throughout the Midwest have been periodically closed due to high bacteria or algae levels. Some lakes are filling up with sediment coming off of nearby fields at rates higher than what should be naturally occurring.

Water quality is generally taken for granted by users, for several reasons

Often, when asked about water quality, people think only of their drinking water. This is just one aspect of water quality. Because drinking water usually comes out of the tap in a good quality, it is generally taken for granted. The challenge to the viewer of the film is to recognize water quality problems and to reconnect with their lake in order to help improve water quality.

Locally and professionally created by Iowa Learning Farms program

ILF program manager Jacqueline Comito directed "Out to the Lakes." She has spent time on Black Hawk Lake throughout her life and was inspired by the lake to make this final video in the series "A Culture of Conservation."

"This is the most ambitious film project we have done," Comito says. "I heard someone say that this film is 'edgy.' We heard quite a bit of laughter during the premiere, which is great, because humor is a powerful tool. But after it is over, we are left with a somber portrait of the state of our environment in Iowa. Until we understand what is happening in terms of our water quality, soil quality and climate variations, our lakes and water systems will continue to degrade."

ILF staff member Ann Staudt served as music and art director and Des Moines resident Jon Anderson produced the film. All the music is original, composed by Staudt and Todd Stevens and performed by the Ames group "Joyful Hearts." The film uses watercolors created by ISU student Jessica Willemssen.

Film has insight into what Iowans know or don't know about water quality

The film features Iowans, not actors, who care deeply about where they live and their local water quality. It also features environmental experts from the Department of Natural Resources, Iowa State University and the University of Iowa. The film offers insight to what Iowans know, or don't know, about water and water quality.

The video premiered at the Conservation Districts of Iowa annual conference in September and is now available on DVD by request and is also on YouTube.

To get a copy of "Out to the Lakes" at no charge by request, send an email to  Iowa Learning Farms at [email protected]. Or send your request by regular mail to Iowa Learning Farms, 219A Davidson Hall, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, 50011. Please include a mailing address in the request. The film can also be viewed in its entirety on Iowa Learning Farms' YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/IowaLearningFarm. For more information about Iowa Learning Farms, visit the website: www.extension.iastate.edu/ilf.

TAGS: Extension
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