Small Grain Variety Test Results Available

If you want to plant oats, wheat or other small grain crops, consult the 2006 Small Grain Performance Test for Iowa.

Results of the 2006 Iowa Crop Performance Test for barley, oat, triticale and winter wheat are now available online at www.agron.iastate.edu/icia/. Published bulletins are also available and may be requested by contacting Iowa Crop Improvement Association (ICIA) at (515) 294-6921 or the Iowa State University (ISU) Extension Distribution Center at (515) 294-5247.

The spring test included oats and barley. The oat test evaluated 22 varieties planted at Ames, Crawfordsville, Lewis, Nashua and Sutherland. Variety yields were limited by dry conditions in May and June. The yield average for all varieties of oats in the statewide test in 2006 reached 119 bushels per acre, with average test weights of 33.7 pounds per bushel.

The barley test evaluated 14 varieties planted at Ames, Nashua and Sutherland. Average yields for barley varieties in the test were 71 bushels per acre with test weights averaging 47.8 pounds per bushel.

Test results include wheat, triticale too

The winter test included wheat and triticale. The wheat test analyzed 16 hard red winter, two soft red winter and two hard white winter varieties planted at Ames, Crawfordsville and Lewis. Average wheat variety yields were 73 bushels per acre with test weights averaging 57.5 pounds per bushel.

Triticale is a grain derived from crossing wheat with rye and is grown primarily for animal feed as either a grain or forage crop. The winter triticale test studied 12 named Triticale varieties and one winter wheat check planted at Ames, Sutherland and Crawfordsville.

The triticale performance in 2006 was up considerably relative to the previous year. Average variety yields were 96 bushels per acre for the wheat check and 100 bushels per acre for triticale. The top triticale variety averaged 107 bushels per acre. The performance data reported includes grain yield, test weight, heading date, plant height, percent lodging and winter survival.

ICIA's crop variety testing program is a cooperative effort with the Iowa Ag and Home Economics Experiment Station at ISU and ISU Extension. The program offers unbiased, third-party information to Iowa farmers on commercial seed they can purchase. Information on the adaptation and performance of hybrids and varieties is offered for alfalfa, barley, corn, oat, soybean, triticale and wheat.

TAGS: Wheat
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