Syngenta Names Cellulosic Ethanol Process Technology 'Cellerate'

Syngenta Names Cellulosic Ethanol Process Technology 'Cellerate'

Cellerate process a collaboration between Syngenta and Cellulosic Ethanol Technologies, LLC

Syngenta on Tuesday announced the name for a its cellulosic ethanol process technology: Cellerate. Enhanced by Enogen corn enzyme technology, Cellerate is a collaboration between Syngenta and Cellulosic Ethanol Technologies, LLC.

Cellerate is designed to increase an ethanol plant's production by allowing the corn kernel fiber to be converted into cellulosic ethanol. Ethanol plants can integrate Cellerate process technology into their existing production process.

Cellerate, in conjunction with Enogen corn, will deliver notable benefits to ethanol plants beyond what can be achieved through either technology alone, Syngenta said in a press statement.

Cellerate, in conjunction with Enogen corn, will deliver notable benefits to ethanol plants beyond what can be achieved through either technology alone, Syngenta said.

Related: Iowa Has Its First Gallon Of Cellulosic Ethanol

"The combination of Cellerate and Enogen represents the next leap forward in ethanol production," said Jack Bernens, head of marketing and stakeholder relations for Enogen corn enzyme technology at Syngenta.

In July 2014, collaboration between Syngenta and Cellulosic Ethanol Technologies, LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Quad County Corn Processors, produced the first commercial-scale cellulosic ethanol in Iowa.

Related: More Ethanol Plants Sign On for Syngenta's Enogen Corn

"The synergy of Cellerate and Enogen will decrease natural gas usage and increase ethanol throughput, while reducing a plant's carbon footprint," said Delayne Johnson, chief executive officer of QCCP. "These advantages, combined with higher protein DDGs and increased corn oil production, make the technology package appealing for ethanol plants looking to improve their bottom line."

View more information about Enogen corn enzyme technology online.

Source: Syngenta

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